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HIST 2310: Fall of Rome

This topic guide is designed to assist students in Mr. Rafalowski's HIST 2310 with writing about ten causes for the Fall of Rome.

Books

Roman Homosexuality : Ideologies of Masculinity in Classical Antiquity

This book provides a thoroughly documented discussion of ancient Roman ideologies of masculinity and sexuality with a focus on ancient representations of sexual experience between males. It gathers a wide range of evidence from the second century B.C. to the second century A.D.--above all from such literary texts as courtroom speeches, love poetry, philosophy, epigram, and history, but also graffiti and other inscriptions as well as artistic artifacts--and uses that evidence to reconstruct the contexts within which Roman texts were created and had their meaning.

Invisible Romans

Check out Chapters 7 & 8

Brings to light the laboring men, housewives, prostitutes, freedmen, slaves, soldiers, and gladiators who formed the backbone of the ancient Roman world, and the outlaws and pirates who lay beyond it. The lives of these invisible Romans emerge from graffiti, incantations, fables, astrological writings, and even the New Testament.

Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome

Traditionally, scholars have approached Roman sexuality using categories of sexual ethics drawn from contemporary, Western society. In this 2006 book, Dr. Langlands seeks to move away from these towards a deeper understanding of the issues that mattered to the Romans themselves, and the ways in which they negotiated them.

The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman World: A Study of Social History and the Brothel

In recent years, a number of classical scholars have turned their attention to prostitution in the ancient world. Close examination of the social and legal position of Roman meretrices and Greek hetairai has enriched our understanding of ancient sexual relationships and the status of women in these societies. These studies have focused, however, almost exclusively on legal and literary evidence.

Articles